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A roundup of the latest in gun safety and children.

A roundup of the latest in gun safety.

One Week in April, Four Toddlers Shot and Killed Themselves

Donald Trump has dropped out of the final pre-Iowa-Caucus debate with the best kid-faking-a-sick-note-from-mom note ever.

We normally avoid political discussions here, because it never gets us anywhere, but Donald Trump has dropped out of the final pre-Iowa-Caucus debate with the best kid-faking-a-sick-note-from-mom note ever.

It starts:

As someone who wrote one of the best-selling business books of all time, The Art of the Deal, who has built an incredible company, including some of the most valuable and iconic assets in the world, and as someone who has a personal net worth of many billions of dollars, Mr. Trump knows a bad deal when he sees one. FOX News is making tens of millions of dollars on debates, and setting ratings records (the highest in history), where as in previous years they were low-rated afterthoughts.

...and deteriorates from there.

Chris Cillizza has a brilliant analysis of the whole thing in the Washington Post today.

Here's hoping this story is incomprehensible to historians reading it in the far distant six months from now.

Black macaque selfie, still copyright-free.
Macaque selfie
I can use this picture because a macaque took it. Look forward to seeing it often.

In August 2014, a court ruled that a human photographer who owned the camera a  black macaque used to take a selfie cannot claim copyright on the picture, using the same logic that says complete strangers don't own the copyright on a the picture you took of them standing in front of the Teddy Roosevelt butter sculpture at the state fair when they handed you their phone to use.

Now a U.S. District Court judge has ruled that the monkey doesn't own the photo either. PETA had brought the lawsuit on the monkey's behalf; the judged determined that the law doesn't specify that non-humans can claim photograph ownership, using the same logic that explains why your car doesn't own the copyright on the photo of you driving through a speed trap on the toll road. Also, since there are no monkeys in PETA, he had doubts about their legal standing to represent their client. (Sidenote: Does anyone actually know where the client is these days?)

The photographer insists he will appeal and win, since he intended to take a picture.

In other words: Black macaque selfie, still copyright-free.