I don't meditate, unless one counts watching a news channel on the weekend and contemplating the meaninglessness of all existence, but Laurie Norton has made Sitting,  a wonderful short film about meditation.

It's paired with two other shorts, "Fade In" and "No, No, You First" and the whole thing is being released as a film called "Triptych."

Here's the catch.

...continue reading "Triptych: Sitting"

I know it's been a hot, miserable summer, but some work needs to be done.

What, another one? I know it's been a hot, miserable summer, but some work needs to be done. I guess. To be fair, it's a lot of work to precisely copy someone else's work. I consider it the highest form of flattery.

The New York Times provides a timely plagiarism Do's and Don't's Best Practices guide for all incoming college freshman.

I am loving this article in the New York Times explaining how to plagiarize. Senator John Walsh (D, Montana) plagiarized much of his  thesis paper for the United States Army War College from other sources, including a 560-word footnote lifted verbatim.

But the best part is the detailed examination by the Times, which amounts to a Do's and Don't's Best Practices for all incoming college freshman. I have to admit to a bit of jealousy; in my day, I had to figure all this out on my own.

When Stephen Colbert wanted to find a first novel to use as an example of the damage from Amazon's hardball tactics, he reached out to Sherman Alexie to help.

When Stephen Colbert wanted to find a first novel to use as an example of the damage from Amazon's hardball tactics, he reached out to Sherman Alexie to help.

This made perfect sense. Alexie has consistently shown himself to be a champion of human rights in general and the decent treatment of writers in particular, but less obviously also an ally of readers everywhere. Writers frequently feel that the reader would have a better experience if we could just get rid if the booksellers and possibly the publishers too, but Alexie was among the first to protest that e-books and electronic gadgets required a level of income far above that available to the people who could really use a good read.

Just this cool guy.