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Wrapping presents tonight? Decorating the tree? Writing cards? Shopping online? How could you possibly be all caught up? Look deep into your heart and be honest.

The NutcrackerWrapping presents tonight? Decorating the tree? Writing cards? Shopping online? How could you possibly be all caught up? Look deep into your heart and be honest. At the very least you have to clear a space for people to sit.

NPR has a collection of holiday favorites you can listen to while you're doing all that.

And if you don't have anything to do because...well, please remember we've all had a time like that, and it will pass. Honest.

Clement C. Moore and Irving Berlin discuss their Christmas classics in a stimulating and sometimes even coherent interview.

Listen to Clement C. Moore and Irving Berlin discuss their Christmas classics in a stimulating and sometimes even coherent interview. Download the podcast at iTunes or at the Dead Authors Podcast site. Yes, I recommended this last year too. It's a classic, I tell you.

Direct download:
Chapter_29_-_Clement_Clarke_Moore_and_Irving_Berlin.mp3

The Secret Museum Reading Series at the New York Public Library invited Neil Gaiman to read from the reading prompt Dickens wrote for himself. He did so.

Charles Dickens was quite popular touring the country doing readings of "A Christmas Carol."

If you missed mine, the Secret Museum Reading Series at the New York Public Library invited Neil Gaiman to read from the reading prompt Dickens wrote for himself. He did so.

The Jonathan Winters version, also using Dickens's script, is still a staple of National Public Radio's seasonal programming, though it's only available online in Windows Media or RealPlayer formats, which is a nice Dickensian touch for the digital age.

There is a lot of mention of food in "A Christmas Carol."

Or, if you have the time and a decent screen at hand, sit back with Alistair Sim's 1951 version.