The Siblings Peculiar dive into Harry Potter conspiracy theories.

The Siblings Peculiar [peh-kew-lair] dive into Harry Potter conspiracy theories.

After you see "Hidden Figures" (or read the book) check out Tom Wolfe's story of the same events. It's interesting to see the same events from a different perspective.

After you see "Hidden Figures" (or read the book) check out Tom Wolfe's story of the same events, sans mathematicians. It's interesting to see the same events from a different perspective; what's left out can be infuriating, but that's what's instructive. And fair dues to Wolfe, his book is a great read and he doesn't contradict the other version so much as leave it out -- possibly was unaware of it? -- concentrating on the story from the perspective of the astronauts, which is what makes the combination of these two versions a compelling, rounded history of this time and place.

 

 

The brief, obvious history of why Charles Dickens wrote "A Christmas Carol".

Why Charles Dickens Wrote "A Christmas Carol"

The beloved story sold 6,000 copies in its first week in print and 15,000 in its first year

Charles_Dickens-A_Christmas_Carol-Title_page-First_edition_1843.jpg
The first edition of A Christmas Carol. The illustration on the left is of Mr. Fezziwig's ball, one of Scrooge's good memories. (Wikimedia Commons)
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There is a lot of mention of food in "A Christmas Carol."

Charles Dickens was quite popular touring the country doing readings of "A Christmas Carol."

If you missed mine, the Secret Museum Reading Series at the New York Public Library invited Neil Gaiman to read from the reading prompt Dickens wrote for himself. He did so.

The Jonathan Winters version, also using Dickens's script, is still a staple of National Public Radio's seasonal programming, though it's only available online in Windows Media or RealPlayer formats, which is a nice Dickensian touch for the digital age.

There is a lot of mention of food in "A Christmas Carol."