After you see "Hidden Figures" (or read the book) check out Tom Wolfe's story of the same events. It's interesting to see the same events from a different perspective.

After you see "Hidden Figures" (or read the book) check out Tom Wolfe's story of the same events, sans mathematicians. It's interesting to see the same events from a different perspective; what's left out can be infuriating, but that's what's instructive. And fair dues to Wolfe, his book is a great read and he doesn't contradict the other version so much as leave it out -- possibly was unaware of it? -- concentrating on the story from the perspective of the astronauts, which is what makes the combination of these two versions a compelling, rounded history of this time and place.

 

 

New digital editions from Apple Books: The Harry Potter books get digital illustrations that mimic the magic images in the Harry Potter books.

The Harry Potter books get digital illustrations that mimic the magic images in the Harry Potter books.

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...It still falls short of the wizard world versions, but maybe that's in part because we know how the trick works these days; maybe wizards aren't as wowed by their own living pictures either.

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Available exclusively through Apple books (or iTunes or whatever they're calling it these days), at least for now. Standard digital versions that work on all platforms available at Pottermore.com.

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Surprisingly, the new versions are competitively priced with the existing editions at $9.99 each; so if you read on an Apple device, and you like to watch the occasional looped cartoon out of the corner of your eye as you read, then why not.

[Illustrations and more details at The Verge and Time.]

According to the New York Times, sales of e-books have cooled off.

fbtu23cov-thumbAccording to the New York Times, sales of e-books have cooled off.  The dazzling arrival of e-books has cooled into the practical, mundane reality of reading. It's not that people have turned against e-books, but they're concentrating on the book, and not differentiating on the platform.

Something similar is happening with phones; while adults and teens are addicted to tiny screens, younger kids are less interested. In part, this is the natural urge to be different from the oldsters; but it's also a lack of tech adoration. These devices are a normal, mundane part of their lives, not magic.

Since we all know the story, let's not speak of it.

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[photo @andreaWBZ]  

By now we've all heard the story of the hitchhiking robot that made it all around the world safely and the was ripped apart by colonial ghosts in Elfreth's Alley, a 17th century neighborhood in Philadelphia. In fact, since we all know the story, let's not speak of it. Let's all agree there are terrible people who see innocent young friendly robots in a dark alley at three in the morning and something about the way the light hits them, or a tone in the speakerbox, maybe the round glowing shape of its dispenser-like head, and some drunk idiot gets the idea it's full of candy and rips it open like a piñata. Let's not talk about it. I wasn't there, I don't know what happened. My wife will testify I was home in bed between 2:58 and 3:02 am on the night in question. My understanding is that this is precisely when it happened, at least a 45-minute drive from our house. I cannot imagine who would do such a thing. It obviously was not full of candy; looking at it in the cold light of day (which is the only way I have ever seen it) there is no way this could be a Hershey bar receptacle.  There is no refrigeration in its little plastic kitty litter bucket body.

I have no idea what that stain is on my shirt. I was cleaning the attic earlier.